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Nov
06

Northern Ontario Community Garden Yields Results Beyond Expectations

Author // Meagan Ann

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The Webequie First Nation is a remote fly in community approximately 500 km north of Thunder Bay. This growing Ojibway community is becoming a champion of community food initiatives. In an area that struggles with access to adequate food, members of the community – along with the help of local food programs – implemented a community garden. Led by Randy Jacob and with equipment donated by the Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN) Food Strategy, volunteers were able to clear half an acre of land to create the garden. With limited supplies, no irrigation system and limited background in gardening, the community garden was able to produce a healthy crop of potatoes by the end of season. The yield was distributed throughout the community, and has inspired plans for the next season. After such a successful first year, the community is looking forward to improving their garden’s yield and increasing crop diversity next summer.

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To learn more about the Webequie community and see what they have planned for the future community garden, visit them on the web at http://www.webequie.ca/.

The Webequie First Nation is a remote fly in community approximately 500 km 
north of Thunder Bay. This growing Ojibway community is becoming a champion of 
community food initiatives. In an area that struggles with access to adequate food, 
members of the community – along with the help of local food programs – 
implemented a community garden. Led by Randy Jacob and with equipment 
donated by the Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN) Food Strategy, volunteers were able 
to clear half an acre of land to create the garden. With limited supplies, no irrigation 
system and limited background in gardening, the community garden was able to 
produce a healthy crop of potatoes by the end of season. The yield was distributed 
throughout the community, and has inspired plans for the next season. After such a 
successful first year, the community is looking forward to improving their garden’s 
yield and increasing crop diversity next summer. 
To learn more about the Webequie community and see what they have planned for 
the future community garden, visit them on the web at http://www.webequie.ca/.
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Oct
22

Graduate student Michael Randazzo in Gitxaala, BC

Author // Meagan Ann

Written by: Michael Randazzo & Meagan Ann O'Hare

Photos by: Micahel Randazzo

Michael (Mike) Randazzo, a postgraduate student at the University of Ottawa, travelled to the British Colombia coastal community of Gitxaala over the past spring and summer. He was given this opportunity through the Students for Canada's North scholarship program offered through the Michaelle Jean Centre for Global and Community Engagement at the University of Ottawa.

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Sep
25

Students for Canada's North inviting proposals

Author // Meagan Ann

The Michaelle Jean Centre for Global and Community Engagement is inviting proposals for the Students for Canada's North (SCN) program

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The SCN Program offers the opportunity to uOttawa students to implement community engagement projects in Canada's Northern Communities. Funding is available for projects responding to the needs of and which have strong support from the given community.

Community Partners in the targeted community and uOttawa students are invited to submit their project proposal. For more information and for instructions on how to apply, visit http://servingothers.uottawa.ca/students-for-canadas-north

Deadline to submit applications for the 2015-2016 academic year is October 31, 2015.

If you need more information on the program or would like to discuss your proposal, communicate with This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or 613-562-5945.

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Jan
02

Learning Canning in Thunder Bay with Arlene Jung from Wawakapewin First Nation

Author // Meagan Ann

 

Mid December 2013, Arlene Jung travelled from her home community of Wawakapewin First Nation to Thunder Bay, Ontario. While she was there, she was invited to the Thunder Bay Friendship Center to host a canning workshop in order to spread her expertise of local food storage. The class of 8 adults and 4 children used various fruits and berries to make a long-boiled jam which they did in a water bath to ensure the seal for months. The flavours were blueberry apple and strawberry; all of which can be harvested from the land. Arlene showed that when using commercial pectin you are instructed to use a horrifying amount of sugar. For the batch of jam pictured below, they opted to use fresh apples as their source of pectin and only put in a fraction of the sugar (2 cups). The pot full of simmering berries was able to make 18 jars of jam which the participants were able to take home to their families. An elder who attended said she loved the flavour of the berries in the batch made with a lower sugar content. Advice from Arlene is that "if you remain connected to your food, you can more easily moderate how much you eat of a less healthy treat".

jam canning TBay

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Nov
19

Safe Food Practices in Carcross/Tagish First Nation

Author // Michael

Donna Geddes from Carcross/Tagish First Nation was trained in the Trainer the Trainer Food Preservation Workshop in Victoria early this year. What Donna learned there has a direct effect on the community; the tools she learned will help fight obesity and other health related risks. Earlier in the month Donna went into the elementary school to teach the youth how to eat healthy and how to preserve food safely. One of the major problems is lack of knowledge about healthy foods and how to keep them fresh for an extended period of time. The Train the Trainer workshop takes these issues head on by teaching not only what is healthy to eat but how to keep it preserved safely. Carcross/Tagish are learning new ways to keep food safe and thus ensuring that the future is a healthy one.

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