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Identify and minimize risks: associated with local ecosystems

spotlight

examine and assess : human health and cultural benefits

spotlight

Assess: environmen tal and socio-cultural viability

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Feb
11

IHRG researcher Receives Canada Research Chair

Author // Meagan Ann

"Dr. Courtney Mason has been appointed as Tier II Canada Research Chair in Rural Livelihoods and Sustainable Communities in the Faculty of Adventure, Culinary Arts and Tourism. Dr. Mason's role at TRU is to act as an engine of research, working to connect the university with the communities it serves in purposeful and meaningful ways.

COURTNEY

The CRC program invests approximately $265 million annually to attract and retain some of the world's most accomplished and promising researchers. Tier II CRCs are identified as exceptional emerging researchers, acknowledged by their peers as having the potential to lead in their field.

Mason's research examines the historical impacts of abrupt changes in land use for rural Indigenous Canadians, and assesses how those communities negotiate the related challenges. Results of his research will influence policy decisions concerning the development of Indigenous lands and resources, which will have national and global relevance, as well as significance at grassroots levels."

Congratulations on this achievement Courtney!

Find the link to the whole article here:

http://inside.tru.ca/2016/02/10/crc-tourism/ 

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Nov
12

IHRG in Fort Providence featured in National Aboriginal Diabetes Association's October Newsletter

Author // Meagan Ann

"Measuring the Impact of Local Food Strategies in Aboriginal Communities to Improve Food Access and Reduce the Prevalence of Obesity and Obesity Related Disease"

"The Indigenous Health Research Group from the University of Ottawa has had the privilege of working with Northern Indigenous Communities in Canada who are developing local food strategies to help provide community members with increased access to nutritious foods. Northern communities are struggling to cope with the high costs and limited availability of market foods, making it difficult to eat a healthy diet...."
To read the complete article and the rest of the National Aboriginal Diabetes Association's October newsletter, please visit
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Oct
22

Graduate student Michael Randazzo in Gitxaala, BC

Author // Meagan Ann

Written by: Michael Randazzo & Meagan Ann O'Hare

Photos by: Micahel Randazzo

Michael (Mike) Randazzo, a postgraduate student at the University of Ottawa, travelled to the British Colombia coastal community of Gitxaala over the past spring and summer. He was given this opportunity through the Students for Canada's North scholarship program offered through the Michaelle Jean Centre for Global and Community Engagement at the University of Ottawa.

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Nov
06

Northern Ontario Community Garden Yields Results Beyond Expectations

Author // Meagan Ann

webequie1

The Webequie First Nation is a remote fly in community approximately 500 km north of Thunder Bay. This growing Ojibway community is becoming a champion of community food initiatives. In an area that struggles with access to adequate food, members of the community – along with the help of local food programs – implemented a community garden. Led by Randy Jacob and with equipment donated by the Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN) Food Strategy, volunteers were able to clear half an acre of land to create the garden. With limited supplies, no irrigation system and limited background in gardening, the community garden was able to produce a healthy crop of potatoes by the end of season. The yield was distributed throughout the community, and has inspired plans for the next season. After such a successful first year, the community is looking forward to improving their garden’s yield and increasing crop diversity next summer.

webequie2

To learn more about the Webequie community and see what they have planned for the future community garden, visit them on the web at http://www.webequie.ca/.

The Webequie First Nation is a remote fly in community approximately 500 km 
north of Thunder Bay. This growing Ojibway community is becoming a champion of 
community food initiatives. In an area that struggles with access to adequate food, 
members of the community – along with the help of local food programs – 
implemented a community garden. Led by Randy Jacob and with equipment 
donated by the Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN) Food Strategy, volunteers were able 
to clear half an acre of land to create the garden. With limited supplies, no irrigation 
system and limited background in gardening, the community garden was able to 
produce a healthy crop of potatoes by the end of season. The yield was distributed 
throughout the community, and has inspired plans for the next season. After such a 
successful first year, the community is looking forward to improving their garden’s 
yield and increasing crop diversity next summer. 
To learn more about the Webequie community and see what they have planned for 
the future community garden, visit them on the web at http://www.webequie.ca/.
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Oct
13

Speaker Series on Indigenous Issues and Initiatives

Author // Meagan Ann

Speaker Series on Indigenous Issues and Initiatives

Erin O'Sullivan, PhD
Strategic Research Directorate
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada


Well-Being in First Nations and Inuit Communities, 1981 - 2011

Wednesday, October 21, 2015
12:30 to 2:00 pm

SPeaker series_on_indig_issues

To find out more, see our event calendar.

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Objectives of the IHRG

Our purpose is to understand how local dietary strategies may contribute to improved health and how local diets can thrive within this global environment.

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